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Marbled Gecko Care Sheet

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The Marbled Gecko (Christinus mamoratus) is a master climber, due to the lamanae on their toes. Their tan-grey color mixed with white and black spots give them their marbled appearance. Although rarer than the Leopard Gecko, they are still a popular choice as a pet lizard.

What should I feed my Marbled Gecko?

Feed your Marbled Gecko a steady diet of small feeder insects including crickets, mealworms, butterworms and silkworms. Pinkie mice can be offered when they are adults, if large enough. They may also eat small squashed fruit, like baby food. Supply a shallow dish of water at all times. Make sure to clean and change the water daily.

What type of enclosure does my Marbled Gecko need?

For one Marbled Gecko, a 20 gallon aquarium will be sufficient. Bigger is always better though. Use a peat moss type substrate (which can be digested), reptile carpet, or newspaper. The two latter options are easiest to clean. The Marbled Gecko will climb, so provide lots of branches to do so, and places to hide.

What about lights, temperature and humidity?

The daytime temperature for a Marbled Gecko should be kept around 80 degrees F, and should be kept on a 12 hour cycle. Provide a basking spot at one end of the habitat reaching 93 degrees F. Do not let the temperature drop below 70 degrees F at night. Full spectrum lighting is not needed, as the Marbled Gecko is nocturnal. Keep the humidity in the enclosure around 75%.

Distribution Map

Marbled Gecko Distribution  Map

More about the Marbled Gecko

Learn a bit more about the Marbled Gecko natural habitat, appearance and characteristics.

Check out our Marbled Gecko Pictures to find out what these small geckos look like.

 
 
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